Editor of Life

Editing—a fundamentally necessary process to get to the heart of the matter; to revise or expunge or correct

When you watch a movie or read a book—or a post like this—it’s likely been edited. Without editing, there may be typos, grammar issues, inconsistencies, and the absence of a through-line (the common thread that ties it all together).

What does editing have to do with a peace full home, spirituality, intentional living or even life?

As in film and literature, our lives are improved when we have meaningful through-lines. When we identify what makes sense, and what doesn’t make sense, we can make revisions and rewrite the rest of the story. And, just like a good editor, we often have to subtract to add. 

Let me explain.
As we
acquire possessions,
fill our calendars,
and spend more time on social media,
we are continually changing our stories.
That seems obvious, right? What we’re not always aware of, however, is that we’re often adding more to an already over-full life.

So, when is less, more?

When possessions and opportunities flow endlessly, appreciation and respect for them is often marginal. They simply become the “wallpaper” of life.

What can you take away, even if it’s only on a trial basis?
How often, if you’re honest, do you add something to your life or home that’s unneeded?
What are you doing automatically in spite of the fact that it has no positive consequence?

Less is more when your life—emotionally, physically, mentally and spiritually—is improved by having in it only what’s of true value.

Sometimes we automatically put an ! on something that should have a ?.

Instead of questioning what we’re adding, we simply do it or buy it. We just go right ahead and put a big, fat exclamation point on it. The fact that we have the ability to do that is amazing. The fact that we don’t consider the “why” is sad.

My friend Bill Kline is the editor of Lehigh Valley Business. This is what he says about editing: “Brevity is important. Does it answer all of the questions? Is it relevant? Is it interesting?”

We can benefit from Bill’s advice. Let’s ask:
Am I expressing what’s important, without a lot of extraneous stuff muddying it up?
Do the things I’m doing or buying answer the question, “how do I want to live”?
Are those things/experiences relevant?
Are they interesting?

When I re-read a post I’ve worked on for hours (or days), I often don’t see the typos because I already know how it’s supposed to read.  I have to either ask for outside help or really step back and look at it with new eyes. This happens in life too. We’re so caught up in day-to-day existence that we don’t always “see” what’s actually going on—we’re simply seeing what we expect.

As the editor of your life, what are you deeply convicted about? If it’s time with God or family, make that more than just one chapter. If it’s a commitment to make our world a better place, move in that direction. Edit your life so that your micro-stories create the big story you want to tell.
Step back from the book of your life and actually read it.
Don’t assume that the last chapter can’t be changed.

When I say something that doesn’t quite resonate with my spirit, I often follow it with “edit, edit, delete, delete”. I’m aware that I have control over what I’m putting out to the universe. You have that control too.

Being an editor of your life means that you move from automatically saying, “yes, yes, yes”, to critically deciding what’s important and what’s not—what’s adding to your life in a positive way and what’s simply adding more to your life.
Edit well.


If you enjoy reading peace full home,
please pass it along. That is the highest
compliment I could receive.
Thank you,
Kay

Blog: peacefullhome.com
Twitter: @kaymclane
Instagram: @peace_full_home
Facebook: facebook.com/kayspeacefullhome/

 

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